The Future of Sanda

Hot martial art enters global contests 

Original Article 


By Andrew Chin   (Shanghai Daily)

13:17, November 21, 2012

The next big thing in Chinese martial arts may well be sandaa combination of striking,kickingthrowing and seizingAndrew Chin visits a class in Shanghai.

Over the past decadethere has been a revived interest in martial arts around theworldPreviously unknown regional styles like Brazilian jiu-jitsu and muay Thai are nowtaught in Shanghaiafter being showcased in international mixed martial arts events.

The most recent event was the MMA Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC), whichmade its debut in China on November 10 in Macau.

Mixed martial artsas its name suggestsinvolves various international styles of martialartsincluding Chinese kung fu

The UFC also aims to popularize the Chinese sanda (sanshoufighting stylewhichcombines four basic skillsstrikingkickingthrowing and seizingIt's sometimes calledkung fu kick boxingIt's both hand-to-hand self-defense and a combat sport.

In the Macau tournamentVietnamese-American Cung Lewho knows sanda andother martial artswon the headline matchknocking out former UFC middleweightchampionAmerican Rich Franklin.

Shanghai residents can beat others to the punch by taking sanda lessons before itbecomes the next big thing in MMA.

A major difference between sanda and MMA is that in sandawhen one fighter is onthe groundthe referee breaks up the match and points are awardedIn MMAthefight continues and the man on the ground fights back and can be struckThustosucceed internationally in MMAsanda fighters need to work on their ground game.

Sanda is the sports version of sanshoua style of close combat fighting that wasdeveloped by the Chinese military during the 1920s at the Whampoa Military Academyin Guangdong Province after studying traditional wushu stylesA modern militaryversion is taught by the People's Liberation Army.

In the 1960s, the Chinese government developed rules for sandaIn 1985, sandacompetitions were part of the First International Wushu Championship in Xi'ancapitalcity of Shaanxi ProvinceThe ninth edition of the event was held in Octoberdrawingathletes from more than 60 countries and regionsMost Chinese fighters come from asanda-training base.

For local American MMA trainer Silas Maynardlearning sanda was essential for hisFighters Unite Shanghai team to stay relevant and in competition.

"We got into sanda out of necessity," Maynard says. "We kept going to these fights andsince the rules are different from muay Thai and kickboxingit didn't go so wellSo westarted getting into sanda heavily about a year ago and are getting more involved inthat scene."

Maynard leads sanda classes three times a week at his Fighters Unite Shanghai gym,also called Sai Rui Gymon Fenglin Road in Xuhui District and he coaches students inbouts almost every week.

Cool sport

The team's youngest fighterHector Tournier from Englandfought last year at the ageof 15 and is now in his second year of sanda training.

"It's a very cool sport and really helped with my balance and flexibility," Tournier says. "I'm pretty active and it helps get rid of some of that energy."

The classes are not restricted to fighters and many students take classes to get inshape.

"It increases core strengthreduces fat and improves your cardiovascular system,"Maynard explains

His student Brice Romain lost 26 kilograms in six months of training and healthy eating.

"When you're trainingeverything is about respect and all the movements are socontrolled," Romain says. "It makes you want to be smarter than your opponent andmotivates you to have your body in good condition."

Women like Nadya Badmaevawho came to Shanghai from Russia a month agoistaking the classShe used to dance and do yoga, "and now I'm learning to fightwhichI like so far."

"A lot of girls are afraid that they'll look like a man taking these classes but it just toneswhat you have," Maynard says. "It takes some of the fat areas away and it gives you acutfit body type."

Students can spar with each other during classbut it's not requiredStudent RichardBecker from France observes, "People have this view that fighting sports are reallyviolent but unless you're actually competitively fightingit's really notIt's a great way tobuild self-confidencestamina and general healthIt builds up something you can beinterested in and do regularly."

Becker has been training in sanda for four years and won the under-18 sandachampionship in France. "Kung fu is quite popular and all 'wushuschools teach sandathere," he says.

Since landing in Shanghaithe 21-year-old has been transitioning from sanda to MMA. "The floor game is the biggest difference," he says. "Alsosanda fighters like grabs andswipes a big morewhich is quite different from MMAwhich is more stand-up fighting."

UFC managing director american Mark Fischer is aware the differences. "Sanda is anexcellent martial art for striking but to be successful at MMAsanda fighters need todevelop grappling skills and other aspects of the MMA ground game."

UFC plans to roll out a development program for Chinese fighters in coming yearsdesigned in part to teach MMA ground game skills.

Since it helped internationalize muay Thai and Brazilian jiu-jitsuUFC can do the samewith sandaFischer saysespecially if more Chinese sanda fighters enter UFC.

Cung Le's recent entry into the UFC has already helped build awareness of sanda inthe West.

Tiequan Zhang from the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region is the only Chinesefighter currently on the UFC roster.

"If you can do sandathen you can acclimatize yourself into MMA quickly," Zhang says. "I think more Chinese fighters will joining the UFCIf they are all sanda-basedpeoplewill find out how good they are."

Comments